Weekend Links Vol. 1: Praise the Lorde, Pussy Riot on the Streets, & Yes, You CAN Touch My Hair

In the spirit of our freshly unveiled Resource Library,  we have decided to start a new weekly feature, Weekend Links. Here at Bluestockings, we love reading and learning from the countless feminist media sources on the Internet. Every weekend, we will gather a set of the most engaging journalism, prose, poetry, art, and Interweb images or memes we have come across. We hope with this small curation of links to recommend big-scale feminist texts printed on larger syndicated news sources, illuminate the work of the prolific and active feminist blogosphere, and at the same time expose and support the readership of smaller outlets of feminist media, like ourselves, that produce excellent work on the web. Check out our links for this week!

Links We Like 

As we read and recommend gender-aware content on the Internet, it is good to remember that we can (and should) simultaneously re-shape and enforce the same standards for the social media we interact with everyday.

  • Don’t believe in racial profiling? Watch this video (experiment on racism) and you’ll see how pronouncedly race and gender prevail in our preconceptions of criminality and innocence. [Upworthy]
  • This article on Angel Haze from last October is worth giving a second read. Haze talks about how hip hop can and should produce awareness of sexual violence. A telling tidbit: “Angel Haze is proof that hip-hop can be both a warzone and a weapon, especially for young women of color. Hip-hop has long rewarded artists who break the silence, and that may end up being the case again.” We couldn’t agree more. [The Atlantic]
  • A new exhibition opening this weekend in New York allows visitors to experience the “tactile fascination” of black hair. Organized by un-ruly, a website dedicated to the black hair experience. In “You Can Touch My Hair,” live models will allow visitors to experience the many textures of black beauty. [ClutchMag]
  • If you are like us, you often raise your hands to Praise the Audre Lorde. And if you are even more like us, you are excited to see that fascination and praise and feminist love get complicated and questioned. Low and Theory have posted an excellent three part look at Audre Lorde’s Legacy and the “Self” of Self-Care. As they adeptly put it,“The Audre Lorde that’s most interesting to me is the Audre Lorde who is a complex, often contradictory historical figure, a figure whose brilliance resides not in her individual insight but in her capacity to creatively animate and inhabit the very contradictions in which she lived.  It is that kind of brilliance that makes her A. Lorde and not, well, a Lord; that is, not a god-like figure whose authority is to be deferred to once and for all, but someone whose life and work provide an rich world of problems, questions, and ideas worth thinking with, borrowing from, confronting, and, of course, disagreeing with.” [Low and Theory]
  • This week in Texas, a man shot 23-year-old Lenora Evie Frago, a “Craigslist Escort”, and was acquitted of her murder. The basis? Since he assumed sex was part of her $150 fee, his actions aligned with the Texas law that allows you to “use deadly force to recover property during a nighttime theft.” Is the life of a woman worth a mere $150? Why are we condoning a man killing another human being for not “putting out? Here’s why it’s wrong. #whorestigmakills #decrimsexwork [Jezebel]
  • Since Clara Rockmore used the theremin, an electronic music instrument patented in 1928, women have been integral to the manufacturing and production of electronic musical history. Therefore, Bitch Magazine has decided to curate a women-made electronic mix tape called “BitchTapes“. [Bitch Magazine]
  • The largest study of its kind suggests that same-sex couples are doing as well at parenting or better than their opposite-sex couple counterparts. [The Age]
  • The ACLU declares that “It’s time to declare the War on Marijuana a failure.” [ACLU]
  • Finally, we leave you with a work-in-progress, yet worth the read, Mixed Race Manifesto. [http://ragnaroktopus.tumblr.com/]

Feminist Blog Roll Fave

Each week we will feature a contemporary  blog we love and read. Today we recommend LIES Journal, a new publication led by feminist collectives in several cities, including Oakland, Baltimore, New York, London, Busan.

LIES is a platform for certain conversations and critiques that are difficult, impossible or dangerous if cis men are in the room. LIES attacks the legacy of racism and transphobia that has plagued feminist organizing and strives to develop new ways of making autonomous feminist practices today that take pointed and militant attacks on white supremacy and transphobia as essential parts of feminist struggle. LIES came out of our experience within struggles. It seeks to embody and develop in print the practice of autonomy that we needed to save ourselves in the midst of movements squared on patriarchy and fueled by the subordination of everyone but white cis men. LIES is a communist journal against communists. LIES draws its purpose and support from networks and circles of feminist, queer, and trans people, our friends and comrades to whom this journal is devoted.

Tumblr Love Worthy Quote

We are always Tumbling, and always find short yet spot on prose. Here is our pick for this week:

The welfare-rights movement was a women’s liberation movement, as much a part of the revival of feminism as NOW, abortion-rights struggles, and affirmative-action demands. That it has not been viewed that way results from a racism that takes white feminism to be the paradigm of feminism, a sexism that allows male grievances to represent a class and race paradigm, and a youth bias that associates the social movements of the 1960s with the young and unencumbered. To understand welfare rights correctly, it is necessary to examine the aspirations of its participants as adult women and mothers. In making this argument I am not diminishing by one iota the degree to which the welfare-rights movement was a black movement, a part of the civil rights militancy which in turn stimulated a New Left. I am calling attention to the particular importance of women and women’s issues in that black militancy.

-Linda Gordon, What Does Welfare Regulate? (via wordswillnever)

Art Worth Sharing 

Pretty self-explanatory. Here is some art, sometimes contemporary, sometimes not, that complicates issues of gender, race, sex, class, or identity more broadly. This week we share with you David Wojnarowicz, 

David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (One day this kid . . .), 1990.
David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (One day this kid . . .), 1990.

Interweb Image FTW

Any meme or Internet image we feel is worth a second look. This week – Queen Bey lays down the body-image law.

beyonce whut fuckh nm

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