Ask Oh Megan and The CSPH: Where Do I Find Ethical Porn?

Welcome to our month-long series on sex & sexuality! If you’d like to contribute content related to the field of sex & sexuality (academic, prose, poetry, art, etc.) please submit to blogbluestockings@gmail.com (This collaboration is brought to you by Chanelle Adams, Editor in Chief of Bluestockings and Web Development Intern at The CSPH).

The following is re-published content from thecsph.org with permission from the lovely, local 501c3 organization. We believe that our mission at Bluestockings aligns with the goals of The CSPH to reduce sexual shame, challenge misinformation and advance the field of sexology.


(originally posted here)

Sex-positive and feminist-friendly porn is not necessarily porn made by women or even marketed to women – it simply takes women into account as viewers and presents sex as something pleasurable for everyone involved. Pornographers aim to treat the stars of the films well rather than exploiting them. Many performers have complete control over their scenes which results in a truer picture of real eroticism, something that is often missing in mainstream porn. Sex-positive porn also features diverse body types, races and gender fluidity, allowing viewers to find something that suits their specific preferences and ideals.

An individual’s tastes in and reactions to pornography are very personal. What some people find sexually stimulating may be of little interest to others, and this is perfectly normal. Some people enjoy pornography and some people simply don’t. Why is that? Porn offers a very blunt view of other people’s sexual lives and can trigger some seemingly random emotions, whether you watch porn every day or have never seen it before. Sometimes a scenario will turn you on but the next day you’ll have no interest or feel ashamed by it. Remember that these conflicting emotions are normal.

Many of us grow up in a society that considers pornography and sex to be “dirty”, “wrong”, or “sinful.” Talking more about things like pornography can help you understand your sexuality better, which can help eliminate any unwanted guilt or shame. Sex and desire are natural, human traits, and resources like The CSPH are here to help you sort through that emotional jumble. The idea that porn is demeaning to women is still common today, and can be one of the reasons some women are not interested in (or are even opposed to) watching porn. This idea reflects the complicated reality that mainstream porn often shows a limited and specifically dramatized version of sex which may incorporate misogynistic elements. Most pornography is not intended to be a teaching tool, yet this is where many individuals learn about sex and what it “should” look like for the first time.

However, not all porn is created equal, and so looking into sex-positive and feminist-friendly porn might help address concerns around that topic. As Annie Sprinkle, an adult film star and sex educator says, “The solution to bad porn isn’t no porn, it’s better porn.” Remember, porn may just not be your thing and that’s fine. There’s lots of other stimulating stuff out there—like romance/erotica novels—or you may not need any outside stimulus for a happy sex life. For us at The CSPH, though, it’s important to advocate for the sexual freedom of those who do enjoy it (read more here).
CPS_468x60

 

PWoD-BannerBottomAS
The CSPH also has an extensive resource of sex positive and feminist-friendly porn incorporating porn that is queer-focused as well as better representative of the diversity of bodies and sexual experiences that exist in society, such as “Doing It Ourselves” (a trans women porn project by Tobi Meyer-Hill).

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

bluestockings magazine
WP-Backgrounds Lite by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann 1010 Wien